407 West State Street, Trenton, NJ 08618  (609)695-3481
 NJLM logo 

William G. Dressel Jr, Executive Director - Michael J. Darcey, CAE, Asst Executive Director

Lewis Goldshore, Esq.

 Assessing Your Town’s Environmental Profile

Lewis Goldshore, Esq.


Lewis Goldshore, Esq., is a partner with the Lawrenceville law firm of Goldshore, Cash & Kalac where his practice is devoted to environmental law, land use law and municipal law.  Mr. Goldshore is environmental counsel to the New Jersey State League of Municipalities and is special counsel to local governments throughout the State.

Municipalities confront a wide and complex array of environmental issues.  These concerns tend to arise in three settings: the management of municipal facilities; the land use process; and assuring compliance with environmental requirements.  A more detailed discussion of these matters is provided in L. Goldshore, Protecting Your Town’s Environment, published by the New Jersey State League of Municipalities.     

 Municipal Facilities

 Local governments own and operate a variety of facilities that have the potential for environmental impacts. The most common of these are municipal buildings, public works garages and storm sewers.  Many towns also provide utility services, principally for water supply and wastewater disposal.

With respect to municipal buildings, it is desirable to regularly inspect fuel oil tanks to assure that they are not leaking.  Similarly, to avoid future problems it is advisable to periodically monitor indoor air quality for asbestos, radon and other contaminants.

 The public works garage presents its own set of environmental risks.  These include how fuels and other hazardous materials are stored, used and disposed of.  The municipal staff needs to be adequately trained to make certain that they adhere to all laws and safety procedures.  It is advisable to retain technical consultants to assist with training and to conduct audits so that desired objectives are achieved.

 It is also essential that municipalities comply with the state’s municipal stormwater regulation program.  Additional information regarding these very detailed regulations is available on the DEP’s website, www.state.nj.us/dep/ and the League’s website

 Governmentally-owned utility systems are required to comply with a broad range of environmental requirements.  Failure to adhere to these standards subjects the owner to serious penalties and other potential liabilities.  

 Land Use Regulation

 The Municipal Land Use Law authorizes local governments to protect environmental resources and the quality of life.  These decisions must be made in a comprehensive manner in accordance with a master plan and development regulations.

 Many municipalities have found it helpful to establish environmental commissions to assist the local land use bodies and other local agencies.  Local open space tax levies to purchase lands for that purpose have been increasingly popular with the voters.

Assuring Environmental Compliance

 Some environmental complaints that come to the attention of local authorities can be handled directly by local and county health officials.  But others will be sufficiently complex to require the involvement of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection or federal agencies.  The DEP can be advised of environmental complaints through the agency’s Hotline, 877-WARN DEP.  It will often be necessary for local government to followup on these complaints to assure that they receive prompt attention. NJLM - Assessing Your Town’s Environmental Profile

407 West State Street, Trenton, NJ 08618  (609)695-3481
 NJLM logo 

William G. Dressel Jr, Executive Director - Michael J. Darcey, CAE, Asst Executive Director

Lewis Goldshore, Esq.

 Assessing Your Town’s Environmental Profile

Lewis Goldshore, Esq.


Lewis Goldshore, Esq., is a partner with the Lawrenceville law firm of Goldshore, Cash & Kalac where his practice is devoted to environmental law, land use law and municipal law.  Mr. Goldshore is environmental counsel to the New Jersey State League of Municipalities and is special counsel to local governments throughout the State.

Municipalities confront a wide and complex array of environmental issues.  These concerns tend to arise in three settings: the management of municipal facilities; the land use process; and assuring compliance with environmental requirements.  A more detailed discussion of these matters is provided in L. Goldshore, Protecting Your Town’s Environment, published by the New Jersey State League of Municipalities.     

 Municipal Facilities

 Local governments own and operate a variety of facilities that have the potential for environmental impacts. The most common of these are municipal buildings, public works garages and storm sewers.  Many towns also provide utility services, principally for water supply and wastewater disposal.

With respect to municipal buildings, it is desirable to regularly inspect fuel oil tanks to assure that they are not leaking.  Similarly, to avoid future problems it is advisable to periodically monitor indoor air quality for asbestos, radon and other contaminants.

 The public works garage presents its own set of environmental risks.  These include how fuels and other hazardous materials are stored, used and disposed of.  The municipal staff needs to be adequately trained to make certain that they adhere to all laws and safety procedures.  It is advisable to retain technical consultants to assist with training and to conduct audits so that desired objectives are achieved.

 It is also essential that municipalities comply with the state’s municipal stormwater regulation program.  Additional information regarding these very detailed regulations is available on the DEP’s website, www.state.nj.us/dep/ and the League’s website

 Governmentally-owned utility systems are required to comply with a broad range of environmental requirements.  Failure to adhere to these standards subjects the owner to serious penalties and other potential liabilities.  

 Land Use Regulation

 The Municipal Land Use Law authorizes local governments to protect environmental resources and the quality of life.  These decisions must be made in a comprehensive manner in accordance with a master plan and development regulations.

 Many municipalities have found it helpful to establish environmental commissions to assist the local land use bodies and other local agencies.  Local open space tax levies to purchase lands for that purpose have been increasingly popular with the voters.

Assuring Environmental Compliance

 Some environmental complaints that come to the attention of local authorities can be handled directly by local and county health officials.  But others will be sufficiently complex to require the involvement of the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection or federal agencies.  The DEP can be advised of environmental complaints through the agency’s Hotline, 877-WARN DEP.  It will often be necessary for local government to followup on these complaints to assure that they receive prompt attention.

 

Click Here to return to the League's Home Page